Frequently Asked Questions
Q.
Why has GigaByte been launched?
A.

Current practices in scientific publishing are unsuitable for rapidly changing fields and for releasing updatable data sets and software tools. GigaByte aims to be a new way to publish research following the software paradigm: CODE, RELEASE, FORK, UPDATE and REPEAT ? 

Q.
What license will my paper be published under?
A.

All our papers are published with the Creative Commons - Attribution License 4.0 (CC-BY).

Q.
Is there an article processing charge (APC)?
A.

The APC is waived for the first 7 months. More information will be provided on costs then. 

Given the current extremely high cost of publishing in the majority of open access journals, after the first year, we will be looking toward ways to keep our APCs as low as possible. Our aim is only to cover our costs: not to take advantage of grant funds that are aimed at promoting research, and not to make profit by any business or investor. Once APCs are in place, we will provide transparency on our costs so that authors and granting organizations have a clear understanding of what an APC covers.

Q.
What is the copyright policy of GigaByte?
A.

All articles published in GigaByte are open access, which means the articles are universally and freely available online. In addition, the authors retain copyright of their article, and grant any third party the right to use, reproduce and disseminate the article, subject to the terms of our copyright and license agreement. Allowing the authors to retain copyright of their work permits wider distribution of their work on the condition it is correctly attributed to the authors.

Q.
What license will my associated data be published under?
A.

ll data supporting our publications needs to be published under a Creative Commons CC0 Public Domain waiver. It is widely recognized that publicly funded research data should be made publicly available for free to be used by anyone. The Creative Commons Zero (CC0) waiver provides the explicit statement of that fact, and it is transparent to all that the data hosted in our associated GigaDB repository are all freely available for any use case. CC0 is thought to be the most appropriate method for dedicating data to the public domain, but for more on the rationale and practicalities see this BMC Research Notes editorial. Citation of data usage is greatly encouraged in order to provide the recognition to the data producers, both for their efforts in the production and in their foresight and generosity in making the data CC0.

Q.
If my article is published, how will it be cited?
A.

Articles in GigaByte should be cited in the same way as articles in a traditional journal. However, because articles in this journal are not printed, they do not have page numbers. And as an online journal, GigaByte does not have issue numbers. Instead, they have a unique article number and a crossref digital object identifier that can be quoted.

Q.
Is GigaByte peer reviewed?
A.

Yes, all papers are openly and transparently peer reviewed by at least two experts in their field.

Q.
How will peer review be carried out?
A.

GigaByte has a fully open (non-anonymous) peer-review as it improves the transparency of review processes and publication as a whole. For more see our Editorial and Reviewer guidelines. We also have a questionnaire-style review process to guide and speed up peer review.  

Q.
Does GigaByte appear in print?
A.

GigaByte is published online only. If you wish to print out a copy of an article, we recommend you select the PDF version of the article online. PDFs of all articles have been formatted in a way that is ideal for printing, so, if you prefer, articles don't have to be read on screen.

Q.
Where are you indexed?
A.

As a newly launched journal we are working to index our papers as widely as possible although this takes time to meet the criteria of publications and pass the review process. The journal is currently indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). We issue CrossRef DOIs and our ISSN is ISSN:2709-4715.

Q.
How does GigaByte guarantee permanence?
A.

All articles published in GigaByte are archived in the CLOCKSS safe open access archive so permanent accessibility is assured.

Q.
What information in addition to my article does GigaByte host?
A.

GigaByte can host all the relevant data and tools from articles published in the journal in its affiliated database, GigaDB. Supporting the open-data movement, data in GigaDB is released under a public domain CC0 waiver. For information on how to submit data with your manuscript, see the GigaDB homepage

Q.
How do I upload my data when I submit my manuscript?
A.

The GigaByte curators (database@gigasciencejournal.com) will contact you with information where to submit your data and other associated Research Objects after you have submitted your manuscript.

Q.
What is a Data Release?
A.

Data Release articles highlight and help to contextualize exceptional datasets to encourage reuse. All data can be linked to the Data Note via our GigaDB repository (GigaDB). Data Release articles focus on a particular dataset, and provide detailed methodology on data production, validation, and potential reuse. Supporting the FAIR Principles for scientific data management and stewardship that state that research data should be Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. Manuscripts containing more detailed biological, medical or technical analyses of data should be submitted to our sister publication GigaScience Journal as a Research Article

 

Q.
What is a Technical Release?
A.

Technical Release articles are a short structured report presenting an open-source software tool or an experimental or computational method, test or procedure for the analysis or handling of research data. Web servers and database articles are also considered.

Q.
What is an Update article?
A.

Update articles serve as a way to publish new data or software information from a previously published article at a time point where there is useful information to share but there are little to no new analyses, conceptual findings, or new software versions completed. Speeding up the sharing of information by removing the need to wait until enough work has been done to be considered a “publishable unit” by most other journals.

Q.
What is the difference between GigaScience and GigaByte?
A.

GigaByte is focussed on less-complex, stand-alone datasets and software reports that have more limited conceptual narrative than GigaScience. Community use and reuse of data and tools being the primary aim, crediting still useful research objects that might be otherwise ignored, but that are of value to more specialist communities.

Using a novel, end-to-end XML platform, means this can be done in a quicker and more cost-effective manner better designed for these more granular research objects that don’t require such a labour intensive and detailed vehicle for sharing.

Q.
What is your policy on Text and Data Mining
A.

Our Open Access Policy goes beyond thinking about our human readers, to assisting machine readability and automated analysis of text and data (i.e. text and data mining or TDM). We strongly support the stance that the right to read is the right to mine. GigaByte articles may be mined, reused, and shared by anyone, anywhere, for any purpose.

Q.
What are your policies regarding pre-prints, and why do you promote their use?
A.

GigaByte promotes a more rapid “open science” mechanisms for disseminating research, and preprint availability is key to reduce the delay between discovery and dissemination of results. To increase transparency and speed up dissemination GigaByte promotes a “release then review” model of scientific communication, and connects to previously published preprint versions that are crosslinked and highlighted via the Article Information section of our articles. Please submit to relevent pre-print servers where you can and provide the details of these to the Editors upon submission or at the latest during peer review.

We encourage the citation of preprints where appropriate in the reference list, and as with our policy encouraging replication studies will not consider them in the evaluation of the conceptual advance of a manuscript submitted for publication.